Archives for posts with tag: wayzgoose

Okay folks, get ready for the biggest blog post ever. Wayzgoose was a phenomenal experience. I met so many wonderful people who are incredibly devoted and committed to letterpress and wood type. To say it was inspiring would not be saying enough. I feel more excited about being involved in this world/this community than I ever have before and I can’t wait to get into the studio and make make make. So, prepare to be bombarded with photos and links.  Here we go!

So, to start with Hamilton was a commercial producer of type.  Starting in 1880, within 20 years they were the largest provider of wood type in the United States. This means that now, as a museum, they have a most impressive collection — there’s a 145-foot wall displaying “more than 1,000 different styles and patterns, ranging in sizes from 1/4-inch to 48-inches, all are housed in cabinet after cabinet, in drawers and on shelves.” It is a just plain incredible environment to be in. Anyone can visit and get a tour (and should you ever find yourself in Wisconsin I highly encourage a visit).

This was the home of the Wayzgoose wood type conference (because where else would a wood type conference be?).  My classmates and I arrived in Two Rivers, Wisconsin late at night on Friday having departed in the evening after our printing class.  We got to our hotel, a darling little place complete with its own miniature golf course, totally excited about the days to come. On Saturday we got up and rushed to the museum, ate some donuts, drank several cups of coffee, and went off into the awesome wood type workshop conference land.

Over the course of the next few days we would hear from James Clough, Paul Gehl, Sandro Berra, Rick Griffith, Juliet Sheen, Jim Sherraden, and Rich Kegler. Now, I’ll be honest and say that I did not know many of these names before the weekend. This is where the crazy linkage starts because these are all people worth knowing about. They are doing amazing things from founding type museums in Italy, to creating a typeface for the Tulalip tribe in the northwestern United States, to making incredible passionate art, to actively preserving the past through use of the letterpress medium, to researching old typefaces in a cultural/societal context. Holy cow there are cool people in the world. Check out Sandro Berra of Tipoteca Italiana type museum here, Rick Griffith of Matter a “full-service strategic design, typographic, and communications consultancy based in Denver, Colorado” here, Hatch Show Print (managed by Jim Sherraden) here, P22 Type foundry here, and Making Faces: Metal Type in the 21st Century a film by Richard Kegler about Jim Rimmer (“possibly the only person who designed and fabricated fonts in both digital and metal formats”) here. Expect more references to these people soon.  I have so much finding out to do!

I hope this wasn’t a too overwhelming post! I think the best part of this experience for me was the realization of the letterpress community that exists worldwide.  All of these folks know each other, work with each other, and support each other.  It was really an incredible thing to witness — all these friends coming together to talk and laugh and make. Really, it was one of the best weekends ever.

So, happy Monday y’all!  Don’t forget to also check out Hamilton Wood Type Museum here.

This weekend I’ll be heading to Wayzgoose, the conference of the Hamilton Wood Type and Printing Museum. I’ll be going to Wisconsin for the first time and hearing great people talk and seeing some great work and spending some quality time with a few of my new classmates. Enjoy this picture of wood type cutters working at Hamilton in the 1960’s (so cool) and have a wonderful weekend all you folks out there!

You can check out the Hamilton Museum here.